nodelusions916:

Ain’t No Way - Aretha Franklin, from the album "Lady Soul" (1968)

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

crystallizations:

Björk photographed by Mark Borthwick.

(Source: vfiles.com, via deathbeds)

houseis 

(Source: Spotify)

drugera:

New Music: Kendrick Lamar ~ “i”

Sun Ra’s Full Lecture & Reading List From His 1971 UC Berkeley Course, “The Black Man in the Cosmos”

(Source: bornofanatombomb, via arabellesicardi)

beatleslovedblackmetal:

Miles rocking it out (ladies…)

(via onedownoneup)

"You can take the pantomime form of the vogue, as like, generally sometimes I do…"

(Source: femburton, via octaviussunflower)

themaninthegreenshirt:

The Miles Davis Sextet, NYC 1958, featuring John Coltrane, Jimmy Cobb, Paul Chambers, Bill Evans and Julian “Cannonball” Adderley

When photographer Robert W. Kelley shot a few rolls of film at an intimate jazz gig on May 14, 1958, evidently neither he nor his LIFE editors were jumping out of their skins with excitement. Kelley provided scant notes describing the evening: just the date, the city and the subject’s name, “Miles Davis,” scrawled on the small archival file of the resulting photos. Why the pictures - which capture the great, ground-breaking trumpeter, then just 31 years old, leading his band in an unnamed New York venue - never made it into print remains a mystery to this day.

Maybe Kelley’s 1958 photos never ran in LIFE because seeing and hearing jazz greats on any given night felt so commonplace in New York at the time - the music mecca Birdland, after all, was just around the corner from the Time-Life Building. Maybe pictures of a ground-breaking young master of the art weren’t something to get worked up about. But six decades later, when Miles Davis’ star shines brighter than ever and he’s acknowledged as one of the genuine titans of 20th century music, it’s hard not to get excited by the opportunity to see previously unpublished pictures of the man and the rest of his legendary sextet.

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

onett199x:

Album Artwork | Blue Note Records 1

1.  Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers - Moanin’ (1958)
2.  Freddie Hubbard - Hub-Tones (1962)
3.  Larry Young - Unity (1966)
4.  Joe Henderson - Our Thing (1964)
5.  Cannonball Adderley - Somethin’ Else (1958)
6.  Herbie Hancock - Maiden Voyage (1965)
7.  Donald Byrd - A New Perspective (1963)
8.  Wayne Shorter - The Soothsayer (1979, recorded 1965)
9.  Hank Mobley - Soul Station (1960)
10.  Andrew Hill - Black Fire (1964)

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

nyprarchives:

This is kind of a big deal…. Zappa freaks have been trading this thing in lo-fi form for years. 

http://www.wnyc.org/story/musical-tribute-edgar-varese-april-17-1981/

The legendary 1981 tribute to Varèse at New York City’s Palladium. The concert famously hosted by Frank Zappa (a longtime Varèse fanatic) and performed by Joel Thome’s Orchestra of Our Time, bootlegs of which had been circulating for decades.

(via nprmusic)

supportrealart:

Truisms (1984) by Jenny Holzer

(via arabellesicardi)